Thursday, 27 September 2012

Meadowtation





















Meditate (verb):
1.    to engage in thought or contemplation; reflect.
2.   to engage in devout religious contemplation, or quiescent spiritual introspection.

Meadowtate (verb):
To lie gently down in the soft, cool green grass of a local meadow, grassland, lawn or other luscious sward – grass stalk in teeth; and to stretch out, arms and legs widely spread out, bare toes extended (separately) heavenwards; then to gaze out, up, across, deep down – outside, inside – and contemplate ….

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To be,
To see
To listen
To hear
And smell, inhale, exhale
To know
To become
…. to be
The Grass

Barren ground ~ a seed of hope
Fragile, pale green fingers extend ~ into light ~ up, to starlight
Reaching, stretching, unfolding
Warm in summer bright
Crackling in photosynthetic light
Richest, light-born life

Roots, delving
Into richest crannies, grasping…
Sustenance ~ succour ~ absorbing
deep, down, nurturing life

Rejoicing ~
Flower heads borne high
Singing, swaying  ~ spreading
Wind-borne life
New ~ renew ~ a seed born hope

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Meadowtation (noun): The process of lying down in a luscious grassland and contemplating – quiescently, deeply, sonorously, dreamily - the inside of one’s eyeballs.


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Now even mice are doing it.






                     

6 comments:

  1. You described, most heavenly, how one studies the insides of one's eyeballs ... on a mattress of grass ... in a process of meadowtation. I loved your exhilarating poem, Craig. It smacks of renewal in a luscious kind of way. :-)

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  2. Thank you, Quirina. Nature provides deep, soothing meadowcation for the troubled soul.

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  3. What a fabulous poem, Craig! It feels so right, poetic to the nth degree. Rumi would be proud of you, man. And you are now an honorary member of the International Society of Neologists. Welcome!

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  4. Thanks for your kind comments, John. I value your appreciation. The words were not meant to be a poem but just some thoughts I might think to come to a deeper understanding the of grass, grassland - to grasp its essential gesture (as in the manner of Goethean Science) and my relation to it. I have also realised that nature, be it a single fragile green leaf, a wondrously coloured flower, the lyrical cheep of a bird, is an unfolding poem.

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  5. Ditto what I said the first time (I'd forgotten you'd written this one) "What a fabulous poem, Craig! It feels so right, poetic to the nth degree. Rumi would be proud of you, man. And you are now an honorary member of the International Society of Neologists. Welcome!"

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